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Is God Necessary? NO! and YES!

Notable American Unitarians 1936-1961

Hartshorne: A New World View

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New Media

Cheating: Gaining Advantage in Videogames

Cheating: Gaining Advantage in Videogames
Mia Consalvo

Mia Consalvo

Consalvo provides a cultural history of cheating in videogames, looking at how the packaging and selling of such cheat-enablers as cheat books, GameSharks, and mod chips created a cheat industry. She investigates how players themselves define cheating and how their playing choices can be understood, with particular attention to online cheating.

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Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics

Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics
Wendy Hui Kyong Chun

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun

"Wendy Chun's important new book explores one of the salient questions raised by networked computing: the paradox of furthering the directly opposed aims of surveillance and democracy, or, as her title puts it, control and freedom. Chun's interrogation of this paradox proceeds through the realms of erotica and race, themselves vexed issues. Anyone interested in new media would do well to read this book." óMark Poster, University of California, Irvine

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun is Associate Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University.

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Democracy and New Media

Democracy and New Media
Henry Jenkins

Henry Jenkins and David Thorburn (eds)

Digital technology is changing our politics. The World Wide Web is already a powerful influence on the public's access to government documents, the tactics and content of political campaigns, the behavior of voters, the efforts of activists to circulate their messages, and the ways in which topics enter the public discourse. The essays collected here capture the richness of current discourse about democracy and cyberspace.

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Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader

Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader
Hilde G. Corneliussen

Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, (eds.)

World of Warcraft is the world's most popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG), with (as of January 2008) more than ten million active subscribers across Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia who play the game an astonishing average of twenty hours a week. This book examines the complexity of World of Warcraft from a variety of perspectives, exploring the cultural and social implications of the proliferation of ever more complex digital gameworlds.

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From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games

From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games
Justine Cassell

Justine Cassell and Henry Jenkins (eds.)

The contributors to From Barbie to Mortal Kombat explore how assumptions about gender, games, and technology shape the design, development, and marketing of games as industry seeks to build the girl market. They describe and analyze the games currently on the market and propose tactical approaches for avoiding the stereotypes that dominate most toy store aisles.

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Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology

Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology
Steven Wilson

Steven Wilson

In this rich compendium, Wilson offers the first comprehensive survey of international artists who incorporate concepts and research from mathematics, the physical sciences, biology, kinetics, telecommunications, and experimental digital systems such as artificial intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In addition to visual documentation and statements by the artists, Wilson examines relevant art-theoretical writings and explores emerging scientific and technological research likely to be culturally significant in the future. He also provides lists of resources including organizations, publications, conferences, museums, research centers, and Web sites.

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The Language of the New Media

The Language of the New Media
Lev Manovich

Lev Manovich

In this book Lev Manovich offers the first systematic and rigorous theory of new media. He places new media within the histories of visual and media cultures of the last few centuries. He discusses new media's reliance on conventions of old media, such as the rectangular frame and mobile camera, and shows how new media works create the illusion of reality, address the viewer, and represent space.

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Philosophy

Cinematic Mythmaking: Philosophy in Film

Cinematic Mythmaking: Philosophy in Film
Irving Singer

Irving Singer

Film is the supreme medium for mythmaking. The gods and heroes of mythology are both larger than life and deeply human; they teach us about the world, and they tell us a good story. Similarly, our experience of film is both distant and intimate. Cinematic techniques--panning, tracking, zooming, and the other tools in the filmmaker's toolbox--create a world that is unlike reality and yet realistic at the same time. We are passive spectators, but we also have a personal relationship with the images we are seeing. In Cinematic Mythmaking, Irving Singer explores the hidden and overt use of myth in various films and, in general, the philosophical elements of a film's meaning. Mythological themes, Singer writes, perform a crucial role in cinematic art and even philosophy itself.

Irving Singer is Professor of Philosophy at MIT.

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Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior

Lee C. McIntyre

Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior

During the Dark Ages, the progress of Western civilization virtually stopped. The knowledge gained by the scholars of the classical age was lost; for nearly 600 years, life was governed by superstitions and fears fueled by ignorance. In this outspoken and forthright book, Lee McIntyre argues that today we are in a new Dark Age--that we are as ignorant of the causes of human behavior as people centuries ago were of the causes of such natural phenomena as disease, famine, and eclipses. We are no further along in our understanding of what causes war, crime, and poverty--and how to end them--than our ancestors.

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Physical and Earth Sciences

Scientists Debate Gaia: The Next Century

Scientists Debate Gaia: The Next Century
Stephen H. Schneider

Stephen H. Schneider James R. Miller, Eileen Crist and Penelope J. Boston (eds.)

Scientists Debate Gaia is a multidisciplinary reexamination of the Gaia hypothesis, which was introduced by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the early 1970s. The Gaia hypothesis holds that Earth's physical and biological processes are linked to form a complex, self-regulating system and that life has affected this system over time. This book provides a fascinating, multi-faceted examination of Gaia as science and addresses significant criticism of, and changes in, the hypothesis since its introduction.

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